Author: Jason Anderson

Teaching English in Africa wins ELTON award

On 2 June 2016, Teaching English in Africa (TEIA) won the British Council Elton award for Local Innovation, after being shortlisted earlier in the year along five other resources in the category including video and online resources, learner libraries, and large publishing companies such as Oxford University Press and Macmillan Education. It was up against … Continue reading Teaching English in Africa wins ELTON award

Why PPP won’t (and shouldn’t) go away

In this talk, delivered at IATEFL Birmingham 2016 (slides available here) I investigate the origins, durability and validity of the PPP paradigm[1] in language teaching. Since the 1990s, when PPP was rejected by a large number of leading writers on (English) language teaching pedagogy (see, e.g., Willis & Willis 1996), a shared mythology about its … Continue reading Why PPP won’t (and shouldn’t) go away

British Council Eltons 2016 – Nomination for Teaching English in Africa

I have just heard that my fourth book, Teaching English in Africa, (East African Educational Publishers, 2015) has made the final shortlist for the Elton 2016 awards in the category of Local Innovation. Great news for the book, and for everyone who worked so hard to help produce it. Many thanks to the content editor Dr … Continue reading British Council Eltons 2016 – Nomination for Teaching English in Africa

You say TESOL and I say TESL, or TEFL, or… Is the English language teaching world a community with identity issues?

Given that the intended benefactors of all English language teaching are students, people who by definition are likely to have difficulty understanding such confusingly similar acronyms in English, it is ironic not only that we have so many of them in English language teaching (ELT), but that understandings of their meanings also vary significantly among … Continue reading You say TESOL and I say TESL, or TEFL, or… Is the English language teaching world a community with identity issues?

How suitable are CELTA courses for non-native speaker teachers?

It's fairly well-known in the ELT world that Cambridge CELTA and Trinity CertTESOL courses were initially designed with the needs of native speaker trainee teachers in mind at a time when ideas of what makes a good English language teacher were very different to what they are today. Back then (1960s-1980s), native speakers were automatically considered the experts … Continue reading How suitable are CELTA courses for non-native speaker teachers?

Buffalo pooh

It’s true. I’m a little bored this week... I found myself musing on one of the most interesting/idiotic (a surprisingly permeable boundary) conundrums in linguistics - what are the longest syntactically complex one-word sentences possible in English? In The Language Instinct (1994: 210), Stephen Pinker mentions the following interesting 8-word effort: Buffalo buffalo, Buffalo buffalo buffalo, … Continue reading Buffalo pooh

ELT Journal Article: Affordance, learning opportunities and the lesson plan pro forma

My recent article for ELT Journal is available free online, here, as it was selected as Editor's Choice article for July 2015. Oxford University Press also asked me to record a short introductory video, now posted on YouTube, where I can be seen doing my Tommy Cooper impression (not discussed in the article): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ReNGZQ90YAo&list=FL_Ny_v5SlZ2aoD0Lljy0lng&index=1 If you … Continue reading ELT Journal Article: Affordance, learning opportunities and the lesson plan pro forma